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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Why has it taken so long to address this section of the Glenn Highway?
  2. Will the roadway be moved from its existing location
  3. Why is DOT&PF reevaluating available alternatives for the highway?
  4. How will pedestrians and cyclists be accommodated on the new roadway?
  5. How much will this project cost, and how will it be funded?
  6. How will the new roadway design mitigate rock fall?
  7. Will the speed limit remain the same once the project is built?
  8. How much right-of-way is needed for the project? Will my property be affected?
  9. Will this project negatively impact the salmon in Moose Creek?
  10. When will construction start, and how long will it take to complete?
  11. Will the highway retain its National Scenic Byway status?
  12. What can travelers and area residents expect during construction? Will the roadway ever be closed?
  13. When will construction start, and how long will it take to complete?
  14. When is the next public meeting for the project?
  15. Where should I direct additional questions about the project?

Answers Answers Below

  1.  Why has it taken so long to address this section of the Glenn Highway?

In 1993, DOT&PF proposed to reconstruct the Glenn Highway from the Parks Highway (MP 35) to MP 109. Given that reconstructing the entire distance at one time would be very disruptive to traffic and cost prohibitive, DOT&PF broke the project into several “phases” of varying lengths. Different phases of the Glenn Highway have since been reconstructed or rehabilitated in an order based on a multitude of factors, including safety record, geometric (design) deficiencies, environmental considerations, and funding limitations. This section is one of the final project phases.

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  1. Will the roadway be moved from its existing location?

The current stretch of highway has an undesirable steep grade and tight curves in to and out of the Moose Creek Canyon. DOT&PF’s current design concept will deviate from the existing highway on the west bluff of the canyon, cross a new bridge over Moose Creek, and rejoin the existing highway alignment on the east bluff. Due to the identification and designation of a historic coal mining district in the project area, the project team will evaluate additional design concepts to minimize the project’s impact to the historic district. Return to Top

  1. Why is DOT&PF reevaluating available alternatives for the highway?

The current preferred alternative features a new highway alignment at Moose Creek Canyon and a new bridge over Moose Creek located approximately 2,800 feet downstream of the existing bridge. Due to recent developments concerning right-of-way, historical and cultural resource impacts, and projected availability of funding, DOT&PF has concluded that proceeding with the currently preferred alternative may no longer be prudent. This new direction for the project is due to a combination of factors and the desire to be good stewards of taxpayer resources.

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  1. How will pedestrians and cyclists be accommodated on the new roadway?

DOT&PF is reevaluating available alternatives to improve the existing roadway and replace the existing bridge. Possible accommodations for pedestrians and cyclists may include expanding road shoulders to 6.5 feet in width.

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  1. How much will this project cost, and how will it be funded?

The Glenn Highway MP 53–56 Reconstruction – Moose Creek Canyon Project is federally funded with an approximately 9% state match. Cost estimates will be further developed after the reevaluation and as the design team finalizes the design.

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  1. How will the new roadway design mitigate rock fall?

An alternative design concept for the new roadway includes laying back currently unraveling or unstable gravel slopes. Under this alternative, wide ditches will be included to catch rolling rocks and keep them out of the roadway. These wide ditches will also help maintenance crews clear fallen rocks more safely and efficiently. In addition, the cut slopes in the new location will not be as steep as those on the existing roadway, and will be benched to mitigate gullying and erosion.

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  1. Will the speed limit remain the same once the project is built?

At present there are advisory speed signs in the project area as low as 35 miles per hour to accommodate the tight curves, steep grades, and limited sight distances in the hills descending into and climbing out of the canyon. The project team will evaluate the speed limit as part of the design considerations.

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  1. How much right-of-way is needed for the project? Will my property be affected?

DOT&F is currently reevaluating alternatives and potential right-of-way needs to improve the highwayReturn to Top .

  1. Will this project negatively impact the salmon in Moose Creek?

No. The DOT&PF project team has coordinated with Chickaloon Village Traditional Council, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to support consistency with environmental requirements relating to fish habitat in the project area.

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  1. When will construction start, and how long will it take to complete?

The project manager anticipates that construction will begin in 2023. The actual construction schedule will depend on the availability of funding and other factors.

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  1. Will the highway retain its National Scenic Byway status?

The project will not affect the National Scenic Byway status of the Glenn Highway.

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  1. What can travelers and area residents expect during construction? Will the roadway ever be closed?

During construction, road users can expect temporary traffic delays, detours, and nighttime road closures. Construction activities such as excavation, hauling, and pile driving will create noise and dust. DOT&PF will work with construction contractors to schedule, if possible, noise-producing construction activities to minimize impacts to area residents.

DOT&PF will outline construction requirements and provide them to the construction contractor.

DOT&PF will conduct active coordination/notification with the public, agencies, emergency services, and others during any closures.

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  1. How can I provide feedback on the project or become more involved?

You can participate in the Glenn Highway MP 53–56 Reconstruction – Moose Creek Canyon Project in several ways. Consider joining the project mailing list, attending public meetings, or providing comments to the project team. You can submit public comments at any time by downloading our PDF comment form and emailing it to info@glennhighwayatmoosecreek.com. Visit the Contact Us page for further options.

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  1. When is the next public meeting for the project?

The next public meeting will be held virtually on October 15, 2020, from 3:00 pm to 7:00 pm Alaska Daylight Time (AKDT). The public meeting will be part of the Mat-Su Transportation Fair.

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  1. Where should I direct additional questions about the project?

    You can email the project team directly at info@glennhighwayatmoosecreek.com. If you have a question for a member of the project team, contact them using the information below:

    Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities
    Clint Adler, Project Manager
    Email: Clint.Adler@alaska.gov
    Phone: 907-269-0544

    HDR Public Involvement
    Josie Wilson, Public Involvement Lead
    Email: info@glennhighwayatmoosecreek.com
    Phone: 907-644-2000

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