The top of the website begins here. Welcome to the Glenn Highway Mile Post 53 to 56 Reconstruction Project at Moose Creek Canyon.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Why has it taken so long to address this section of the Glenn Highway?
  2. Will the roadway will be moved from its existing location
  3. Where will the new bridge over Moose Creek be located, and what will it look like?
  4. How will pedestrians and cyclists be accommodated on the new roadway?
  5. Will passing/climbing lanes be added to the roadway as a part of the project?
  6. What will happen to the existing roadway and bridge once the new section is constructed?
  7. How much will this project cost, and how is it going to be funded?
  8. How will the new roadway design mitigate rock fall?
  9. Will the speed limit remain the same once the project is built?
  10. How much right-of-way is needed for the project?  Will my property be affected?
  11. Will this project negatively impact the salmon in Moose Creek?
  12. When will construction start, and how long will it take to complete?
  13. Will the project look different? Will the highway retain its National Scenic Byway status?
  14. What can travelers and area residents expect during construction? Will the roadway ever be closed?

Answers Answers Below

  1.  Why has it taken so long to address this section of the Glenn Highway?

In 1993, the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (DOT&PF) proposed to reconstruct the Glenn Highway from the Parks Highway (MP 35) to MP 109. Given that reconstructing the entire distance at one time would be very disruptive to traffic and cost prohibitive, DOT&PF broke the project into several “phases” of varying lengths. Different phases of the Glenn Highway have since been reconstructed or rehabilitated in an order based on a multitude of factors, including safety record, geometric (design) deficiencies, environmental considerations, and funding limitations.

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  1. Will the roadway will be moved from its existing location?

The current stretch of highway has an undesirable steep grade and tight curves in to and out of the Moose Creek Canyon. DOT&PF’s current design concept will deviate from the existing highway on the west bluff of the canyon, cross a new bridge over Moose Creek, and rejoin the existing highway alignment on the east bluff. Due to the identification and designation of a historic coal mining district in the project area, the project team will evaluate additional design concepts to minimize the project’s impact to the historic district. Return to Top

  1. Where will the new bridge over Moose Creek be located, and what will it look like?

The current design concept feature a new two-lane bridge over Moose Creek located 80-100 feet above the creek and approximately 2,800 feet downstream of the existing bridge. The design will be similar to the bridges over Hicks Creek and the Knik River, with concrete girders and railings. The new bridge may have three to four piers, and be approximately 700-900 feet long. The design team will develop additional bridge design details as the design process advances. Due to the identification of a historic coal mining district in the project area, the project team will evaluate additional design concepts which may lead to moving the new bridge location or require a longer bridge to minimize the project’s impact to the historic district. Return to Top

  1. How will pedestrians and cyclists be accommodated on the new roadway?

The current design concept for new roadway and bridge includes 8-foot wide shoulders to accommodate pedestrians and cyclists.

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  1. Will passing/climbing lanes be added to the roadway as a part of the project?

The current design concept features a westbound climbing lane to the west of the new bridge . Currently there is a westbound passing/climbing lane located between MP 53.5 and the curve into the canyon at MP 54, and an eastbound passing/climbing lane just outside the project limits at MP 56.

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  1. What will happen to the existing roadway and bridge once the new section is constructed?

Due to the relatively high cost of maintenance and inspections of the old and deteriorating bridge, and the plan to accommodate pedestrians and cyclists on the new highway, the existing bridge will be removed. The existing (“old”) Glenn Highway will remain open, but will end in a cul-de-sac on either side of Moose Creek. Access roads will be built from the new roadway to the existing roadway on either side of the new Moose Creek Bridge.

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  1. How much will this project cost, and how is it going to be funded?

The Glenn Highway MP 53-56 Reconstruction--Moose Creek Canyon Project is federally funded with an approximately 7% state match. We estimate the project will  cost approximately $60 million (including design, right-of-way acquisition, utility, and construction costs). As the design team finalizes the design, they will refine the cost estimates will be further refined. The construction of this project is contingent upon the availability of funding.

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  1. How will the new roadway design mitigate rock fall?

The design concept for the new roadway moves the alignment farther away from the existing steep, unstable gravel and cobble slopes of Moose Creek Canyon and includes wide ditches intended to catch rolling rocks and keep them out of the roadway. The wide ditches will also help maintenance crews clear fallen rocks more safely and efficiently. In addition, the cut slopes in the new location will not be as steep as those on the existing roadway, and will be benched to mitigate gullying and erosion. Return to Top

  1. Will the speed limit remain the same once the project is built?

At present there are advisory speed signs in the project area as low as 35 mph to accommodate the tight curves, steep grades, and limited sight distances in the hills descending into and climbing out of the canyon. Once completed, the speed limit will be 55 mph. This speed is consistent with the section of the Glenn Highway between Palmer and Sutton Signs. There will be flashing beacons near the Chickaloon Village Ya Ne Dah Ah School (near MP 55.5), notifying drivers that they are in a rural school zone.

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  1. How much right-of-way is needed for the project?  Will my property be affected?

Right-of-way will need to be acquired to realign and improve the roadway. Once the design has advanced to a greater degree of certainty, DOT&PF will proactively contact affected property owners and agencies during the right-of-way acquisition phase, anticipated to begin in late 2018 or early 2019.

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  1. Will this project negatively impact the salmon in Moose Creek?

DOT&PF is aware of Chickaloon Village Traditional Council’s (CVTC) ongoing salmon population restoration project in Moose Creek. The DOT&PF project team will coordinate with CVTC, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to ensure consistency with environmental requirements relating to the creek habitat in the project area.

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  1. When will construction start, and how long will it take to complete?

Construction is anticipated to begin in the summer of 2021 and will likely take 2 years to complete. The construction schedule will depend on the availability of funding, acquiring necessary property and other factors. Return to Top

  1. Will the project look different?  Will the highway retain its National Scenic Byway status?

According to the present design concept, the new highway will be in a new location, straighter, less steep, and widened to 12-foot lanes and 8-foot shoulders. Some high cuts into roadside hills will be necessary. Wide ditches will be built on the side of the road to provide an area for rockfall and improve safety for vehicles in case of accidental run-off-the-road incidents or for intentional safety maneuvers. East of the proposed new bridge, the highway will be located on top of a high embankment.


The project will not affect the National Scenic Byway status of the Glenn Highway. Similar to many of the recent improvements along the Glenn Highway corridor east of Sutton, the views from the new alignment will be enhanced.

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  1. What can travelers and area residents expect during construction?  Will the roadway ever be closed?

    During construction, road users can expect temporary traffic delays and detours. Nighttime road closures will occur as a part of construction. Construction activities such as excavation, hauling, and pile driving will create noise and dust. DOT&PF will do its best to schedule noise producing construction activities at times when impacts to area residents are minimalized.

    DOT&PF is seeking public feedback on construction traffic control and would appreciate your thoughts on how best to minimize construction impacts. Construction requirements will be outlined by DOT&PF and provided to the construction contractor.

    DOT&PF will conduct active coordination/notification with the public, agencies, emergency services and others during any closures.

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